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1124 Colquitt Ave NE
Atlanta, GA, 30307
United States

912 398-0225

Arts Blog

Arts Blog

Thoughts & Musings

NOVEMBER EXHIBITIONS

Caitlin Zelinsky

" With planing for the holiday pre-season in full swing, I've drafted a short list of must see art exhibitions for November, 2015. (Let's see how many you can check off the list!) I've also added links and gallery hours to help you navigate..."

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Soft Eyes at whitespace gallery

Caitlin Zelinsky

Soft Eyes is a group show curated by gallery artist Pete Schulte, on view at whitespace gallery from August 7 - September 12 2015.  "It is undoubtably a successful exhibition when you spend over an hour in a gallery and on your way to the car and involuntarily spin around..."

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MARCIA WOOD 'AUGUST GEOMETRY'

Caitlin Zelinsky

August Geometry, a group show curated by gallery owner Marcia Wood, is on view till September 5, 2015 at their Atlanta midtown location. A.G. is breaking down the basic fundamentals (think color, line, perspective, etc..) in this quirky end of summer exhibition.

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AUGUST EXHBITIONS

Caitlin Zelinsky

Have I told you how much I love August? The summer nights start cooling down, there seems to be a freshness in the air, and art galleries always end the summer with a bangin show. This month seems to be all about color, movement, and a lot of abstraction. Here's a list of Galleries and their current exhibitions to help you stay organized. You're welcome. I love you too. 

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Q&A WITH WILLIAM MASSEY III

Caitlin Zelinsky

I can’t tell you how excited I am to have my very first artist Q&A session to be with my dear friend, William Massey III. (I am equally in awe of his talent and his heart, and soon you will be too!) Join us as he shares his views on Atlanta, our homeless, future projects and his favorite spots. enjoy. 

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Endless Road: A Look at Nexus Press @ THE CONTEMPORARY

Caitlin Zelinsky

Look at these spectacular books! I'm going to be absolutely honest with you: artists books have completely flown under my radar. And yes, I went to art school. Just in case you have managed to walk this earth without knowing either - allow me to fill you in on these little gems. First off, they aren't printed portfolios or simply 'hand-made books': all were printed and bound at Nexus Press. For 26 years the Nexus Press was a leg of The Contemporary (f.k.a. The Contemporary Arts Center) that printed and published these innovative and highly stylized artist books. From concept to design: the entirety of the book's theme is a congruent thought spread out over multiple mediums.

Created in very low editions, sometimes only one was printed, the rest was shipped off to major art academies and universities all over the world. Just in case you are as enthralled as I am and NEED TO SEE MORE, Emory and SCAD both have extensive collections of artist books here in Atlanta. 

I'm calling on all artists living and working in Atlanta - lets see what YOU come up with! Lets revive this art form and create more of these incredible books. Email me and I will display them right here on the Modern Gallerist! 



Bruce Davidson & Sally Mann at Jackson Fine Art

Caitlin Zelinsky

Calling all photography lovers, vintage seekers, and Americana dreamers: This exhibit is for you! (And it ends in a month so go see it NOW) If you don't know these photographers, do your research before you go. From the Guggenheim to MOMA to Rolling Stones, Davidson and Mann have very extensive careers. In different ways, they have successfully painted a portrait of America from the 60s to well...now. 

I've never been to an exhibition where I left so elated and aggravated at the same time. Let me explain. Jackson Fine Art did a remarkable job handling Bruce Davidson's double exhibit. Leading with his IN COLOR series of his never-before-printed photos from his private archives, Davidson's photos talk of both city life and rural adventures. From images of kids in heavily graffitied train cars to women prepping themselves before a stage performance, it seems Davidson photographed the vibrant scenery around him. In THE BROOKLYN GANG series, Davidson opens up the closed doors of this private "gang". With greasers and high wasted skirts, this exhibit is chalk full of cigarettes, kissing, street ball, and a whole lota nostalgia.

Here's where the exhibition turns sour. I've come to the end of the gallery. Where is Sally Mann's exhibit? I even looked in the open storage room, hoping it was an extension to another part of the building. Turning around I went to ask the gallerists where her work was. I'm not going to fault them for being busy, carrying on conversations of what they think would sell and what would not, this is a place of business remember. But after waiting patiently for a few minutes, I politely interrupted and asked where her photos were. "Well, they are right in front of you!" In the "viewing room": a tiny, crowded room, with a cramped desk in the corner, 5 people talking shop with photos spread out on top of a large flat file spanning the width of the room, with Sally's photos hanging on the wall behind them. Let me tell you: Sally Mann is a force to be reckoned with! Google her. She's an American hero! (ok, she's an American hero in my book) but she is one of the top female photographers for her rural landscapes, intimate family portraits, and other amazing photos dealing with the issues surrounding life and death and AMERICA. Come on Jackson Fine Art, what happened!? I couldn't get close enough to see what photos were on view, and no one seemed to notice me straining to get a better look, so I left without a good look at any of her photographs. Scroll down to the last two photos in the exhibition and you'll see my frustration.   

SHAWNE MAJOR: Surface Tension

Caitlin Zelinsky

Loving these beautiful artworks by Shawne Major!! On view till July 25 at Marcia Wood GallerySurface Tension is a collection of large-scale assemblages made from found objects (think bullet casings  beads  legos) stitched in to brilliant, bold designs. Full of eye candy, these tapestries look like road maps or arial views from afar and are equally entertaining up close. I recommend stoping by next time you are in the Virginia Highlands. 

Larry Jens Anderson's Retrospect at MOCA GA

Caitlin Zelinsky

When debating which exhibition would be layed out in my first blog post, Larry's retrospect was not at the top of my list. Frankly, it wasn't even in the first draft. But here I am, two weeks after visiting the museum, that his work is still very much present in my thoughts. I have to warn you, this is a tough exhibit to walk though. (I told you all good art isn't necessarily pretty) With gay marriage finally legalized in all 50 states, it's interesting to see the art of a man who wasn't as fortunate as we are today.

Larry confronts the issues of growing up gay during a time when it was not accepted in his Retrospect at MOCA GA. In his "Only Dick, no Jane" series, Anderson uses the repeated imagery of a small boy, seemingly clipped from a child's coloring book, and applies "female" attributes to them. Whether it's bright colors scribbled outside the lines, 60s pop flowers, or glitter, Anderson connects with feelings of  "I'm different" from a very early age. Moving along, the art develops into highly conceptional thesis's, far beyond the little boy playing with girl's toys. For example, his I Am the Center of the Fucking Universe, 2002 he pastes a large asterisk symbol in the center of a white paper and hangs it in a black frame. Upon closer look, surrounding the symbol are descriptive words written in white. Words like faggot, and twat. These works are incredible on two fronts. First, he is hinting that we, as humans, are more than what first meets the eye. We are greater then a symbol, or what we are perceived to be. Secondly, he forces you to come close, connecting the viewer and the artist's true self. You can almost feel the hate steaming off the page. You may not have said these words, but someone once did and you can see/feel the aftermath. With contrasting black and white word play and fallen angel imagery, there seems to be an invisible tension surrounding this group of artworks. 

Once this sinks in, there is one room left for you to walk through. On the far wall you see large scale nude paintings of males pointing heavily at each other. In the center of the room stands a white box stating the number of people fallen to A.I.D.S. during the 80s and 90s epidemic. Visitors are asked to write the names of their own friends and loved ones lost on the outside of the box. (When I visited there were already 100s of scribbles coloring the outside of the container) Upon further inspection, you notice the window where you can see inside. Body bags...pilled high on top of each other. A mummified body hangs over the installation. On the gallery walls are crucifixes made up of various tools and found objects.

I told you it was intense. 

With the very recent legalization of gay marriage, this curator couldn't have picked a better time to show this particular body of work. Larry painfully opens up about being gay in an unfriendly gay world, one that is hopefully behind us. He shows us how words can hurt, and how hiding your true feelings probably hurts much more. 

"I make art in defense of who I am and would like to radically change that discussion" - Anderson

"Just Dick, No Jane" Series
I Am the Center of the Fucking Universe, 2002. courtesy of MOCA GA

I Am the Center of the Fucking Universe, 2002. courtesy of MOCA GA

detail of I Am the Center of the Fucking Universe, courtesy of MOCA GA

detail of I Am the Center of the Fucking Universe, courtesy of MOCA GA